A Química da Alma

Robots, Outer Space & Sweet Soul Music
This blog is dedicated to rediscovering lost classics and purveying the future exploration of space via spaceships and robots. It is written by me, Louis Kam, for you.
Sep 25
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Heaven & Earth - I Really Love You. Recorded in 1981, this song comes years after the height of Heaven & Earth’s long stint with Mercury Records. With this change also came a change in the production. Instead of the more laid back crooning audiences were used to, the new Philly sound kicked them up a notch (and into the 80s) with some new disco influences. Regardless, “I Really Love You” is a classic that combines all sorts of influences from the old to the new.


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Sep 16
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Al Green - Something. Picking one Al Green song from his immense discography is not easy. I had meant to do an Al Green showcase long ago but with everything he has put out, it proved just a little difficult. Today, while the playlist was on random, this gem popped up and it just felt perfect. “Something” is a haunting yet beautiful piece of music that seems to embody what makes Mr. Green’s music so timeless. Delightfully smooth and just genuinely soulful, for lack of more descriptive words, you will no doubt understand as soon as you hear it. I can’t help but smile when listening to this.


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Sep 14
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Cornelius Brothers & Sister Rose - Since I Found My Baby. The last single from the soul singing family quartet, this classic only managed to find its way onto their 1976 farewell Greatest Hits album (to the best of my knowledge). Regardless of what it was released on, this song highlights their short career and guarantees a lasting place in the history of soul music. It is sultry yet raw, expressive yet bashful, and most importantly it is just an incredibly enjoyable piece of music.

PS I’m back!


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Jul 23
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Flowside - Questions. Today, I thought I’d change it up. Remember Pat Stalworth back on April 19th? I managed to get in contact with the original songwriter, Bill Jacocks, who has quite a stunning legacy himself. After we spoke, I decided to create a cover version of this song which is easily one of my top 10 songs of all time. Needless to say I am very excited to be unveiling this, as it took about a week and a half to complete and get all the instrumentation just right. Here’s the result without vocals, which will come later. Enjoy.


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Jul 21
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Lorraine Johnson - The More I Get, The More I Want. We haven’t really touched on many true disco songs. Certainly, we’ve included many disco influenced songs, but now, the original sound of party rocking will be the focus. Written and produced by the legendary duo McFadden & Whitehead (James Brown, Teddy Pendergrass etc.), “The More I Get, The More I Want” sounds like a precursor to modern diva house. Featuring an incredibly ranged singer, simple lyrics, and a funky bassline, tunes like this would enter the hearts and minds of partygoers for years to come (and indeed still are).


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Jul 17
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Josipa Lisac - Kapetane Moj. Today we embark on road to Croatian pop music. While American audiences were filling themselves with “Papa Was a Rolling Stone,” much of Europe maintained a different, ballad-laden form of pop music. Josipa Lisac, who was born in raised in Croatia, was no exception. Much of her music seems more suitable for James Bond films, with her brash voice complementing the instrumentation perfectly. Today’s selection comes from her 1973 album Dnevnik Jedne Ljubavi, and although I have no idea what she is saying in this song, I believe she means it. Please enjoy.


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Jul 13
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Kay-Gees - S.T.P. (Singing, Teaching and Preaching). An offshoot of Kool and the Gang’s Gang Records imprint, the Kay-Gees were a premier funk and disco band until their switch to full blown disco with their switch to the ever popular Delite label. “S.T.P.” is somewhat of a classic, with traditional disco calls, funky rhythms, and even the inclusion of a xylophone (which strangely takes us into the rainforest for a segment). This song is a prime selection of the shift in style from the funk to disco era of popular music. Enjoy.


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Jul 12
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Nancy Holloway - Hurts So Bad. In the same summertime vein as some of the other recent posts, I have decided to include the 1969 lounge hit from Nancy Holloway, found on her record Hello Dolly. A chillingly wonderful lounge tune, this song is perfect for a late night get-together between close friends. Although not a household name, “Hurts So Bad” can easily compete with your favorite Shirley and Dusty tunes. Unlike common blue eyed soul, however, Nancy Holloway has more of a traditional soul sound mixed with a tiny bit of 60’s go-go. Keep this one close. It’s special.


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Jul 08
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Strutt - Time Moves On. This song comes from a period disco album with an abundant funk kick. Strutt was not fantastically popular, reproducing some good but generically written songs. However, their music, without a doubt, kicks off the summertime mood with a bang, even bringing fun to such a delicate topic.


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May 09
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Arthur Verocai - Pelas Sombras. In keeping with the tradition of giving influential characters their due praise, Mr. Verocai is perhaps at the top of the list of deserving musicians. During the military rule of Brasil between 1964 and 1985, artist, musicians, and those that wanted to say whatever they wanted were commonly drug off in the middle of the night, never to be seen again. Despite the very real threat of death, Mr. Verocai continuously pushed his psychedelic pop soul sound, producing for a myriad of artists including Jorge Ben. Taken off his (almost) lost solo-album from 1972, “Pelas Sombras” (For The Shadows) is a smooth blend of bossa rhythms, smooth string sections and an early evening Rhodes piano. Enjoy while gazing out to sea.


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